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AMALOUNA Student as Researcher Initiative

17 October 2017

One of the science breaking laws was discovered after a man asked himself a question, “Why did the apple fall downwards?” Newton then hypothesized his theory and went on to initiate laws that we still use in physics class up to this day. Asking questions then sculpting a path to discover its answers is not an easy thing to do. Research is the essence of humanity, for without it we would not know how and why the world functions the way it does.

I am honored to say that I was one of the students able to participate in the AMALOUNA’s “Student as Researcher Initiative (SRI)”. This program combines students from public and private schools to work on PhD research questions in the AUB Science labs under the supervision of lab advisors. The topic of each group ranged from ones related to Leukemia and others that would aid in curing non-treatable diseases. We were put under the circumstances of real-life researchers and scientists as we analyzed results and experiments from topics we have never heard of. Then, our research and experimentation results were presented to our family members and doctors of different scientific fields.

The SRI allowed me to explore fields and different options that broadened my perspective of the research facilities, and opened my eyes to new ideas in the fields of medicine. In the end, science is always developing especially in terms of human health and development, so being a part of the cultivation of the medical industry really is a huge privilege. Though I do tend to be anti-social sometimes, I had to break out of my comfort zone by meeting new people from different schools, along with experts in the vast scientific fields. I might’ve felt out of place sometimes, especially with the rather long scientific words and terms, but as Albert Einstein once said, “If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn’t be called research.”

The highlight of this whole experience was being able to discuss and present our work. I have never presented a project with a vast number of listeners motivated to learn new ideas and new facts. Such an educated surrounding provided me with a warming feeling that brains and science does overcome all odds.

One of the participating students, Sabine Shehab from Grade 12 International Programme (IP), expressed her thoughts by saying, “From this experience, I’m grateful to have learned about the extensive work that goes into research and to have met some professional researchers. Additionally, it gave me a glimpse into the vast, unknown world of research and provided me with an opportunity to explore if I want to become a researcher in the future.”

Nadine Kawash , Grade 12 Life Science Student